A summary of the stanzas of ode to a grecian urn

It has survived intact from antiquity. It is a "sylvan historian" telling us a story, which the poet suggests by a series of questions. Who are these gods or men carved or painted on the urn? Who are these reluctant maidens?

A summary of the stanzas of ode to a grecian urn

Keats once again encounters the paradox that is central to all of his art: To achieve immortality is to rid oneself of change, but it is change, not stasis, that produces the contrasts necessary for all that is good.

The urn cannot speak, in other words, until it is spoken to. That is a significant point, for it leads to the conclusion that the immortal urn exists in any meaningful way only when it comes into contact with, and is activated by, the inquiring intelligence of a mortal observer.

Immortality, the poet again seems to be saying, depends in some fundamental way upon its opposite. He then begins asking the urn questions about the people portrayed on the side of the urn. Stanza 2 shifts from questions to observations. The first observation stems from the experience of the first stanza.

Having tried to experience imaginatively the scene before him, the poet reaches the conclusion that the imagination, when engaged by art, produces an experience that is superior to reality.

A summary of the stanzas of ode to a grecian urn

It would seem, therefore, that Keats is suggesting that the world of the imagination, which is the world of art, is preferable to the world of actuality.

In the ideal world of art, where life need not conform to the limitations of flesh and blood, everything is as it should be; there the leaves never fall from the trees, no one ever dies, youth never fades, and lovers are forever young and forever in love.

Keats comes to that realization through the scene before him: In attending this celebration of life, they have left their village forever, never to return. The celebration of life on the urn has its counterpart in the unspoken death of the village.

Again Keats brings life and death together, but in this case both are made immortal through art.

A summary of the stanzas of ode to a grecian urn

In the end, the poet sees the urn as a friend to humanity, but that friendship resides less in the particular truth that the urn has to teach humankind and more in the fact that the message is truth, and truth whether joyful or painful is beautiful.

The questions of whether the permanence of art is good or bad, whether immortality is better than mortality, or whether stasis is preferable to change are all set aside in the end in favor of a statement about the lasting importance of truth—all truth—and the capacity of art to convey that truth from one generation to the next.Thou foster-child of Silence and slow Time, The urn is called the "foster-child" of Silence and slow Time.

A "foster-child" is a kid who is adopted and raised by people other than his or her own parents. In this case, the urn has been adopted by "Silence" and "slow Time," which, if anything, sounds. Summary of Stanza I of the poem Ode on a Grecian Urn.

Line-by-line analysis. "Ode on a Grecian Urn" is organized into ten-line stanzas, beginning with an ABAB rhyme scheme and ending with a Miltonic sestet (1st and 5th stanzas CDEDCE, 2nd stanza CDECED, and 3rd and 4th stanzas CDECDE).

"Ode on a Grecian Urn"

Ode on a Grecian Urn () Stanza 2: Line Heard melodies are sweet, but those unheard is truth truth beauty interpretation easy discussion of Keats ode on a grecian urn easy explanation of ode on a grecian urn john keats ode on a Grecian urn ode an a grecian urn interpretation ode on a grecian urn analyse ode on a grecian urn.

In this stanza, the speaker seems to have moved on to another of the pictures on the side of the urn. (We think there are a total of three different scenes depicted on the urn, and this is the second.) As in the first scene, there is music playing.

The music is being played on "pipes," which is . By naming his poem an "Ode on a Grecian Urn", Keats has brilliantly used the pun. An ode is essentially a Greek poem, which gives praise.

SparkNotes: Keats’s Odes: Ode on a Grecian Urn Check new design of our homepage!
From the SparkNotes Blog Lines Heard melodies are sweet, but those unheard Are sweeter; therefore, ye soft pipes, play on; In this stanza, the speaker seems to have moved on to another of the pictures on the side of the urn. We think there are a total of three different scenes depicted on the urn, and this is the second.
Navigate Guide Maybe we should leave you alone with this urn.
Ode on a Grecian Urn - Wikipedia Ode on a Grecian Urn Summary In the first stanza, the speaker stands before an ancient Grecian urn and addresses it.

And the urn depicted in the poem is Grecian. The animal sacrifice (which was done in worship of the Greek Gods), and the references to "Tempe" and "Arcady" all pertain to Greece.

SparkNotes: Keats’s Odes: Ode on a Grecian Urn